0670 – Royalty

Harry and Meghan to ‘split’ from charity foundation shared with Cambridges

Princes William and Harry and their wives are to work together on ‘one off’ charitable projects, amid mounting specu-lation the Sussexes are to split from the foundation the couples set up together. In a sign of a further distancing between the two royal households Prince Harry and his wife Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, are set to work on their own separate projects, while occasionally coming together for shared initiatives. It comes after it was announced the two households of the Sussexes and Cambridges are to be run separately, following Prince Harry and Meghan’s move of their family home from Kensington Palace to Windsor. The separation of the two households led to a review of the way the Royal Foundation, launched in 2009, operates, with an announcement expected later this month [June]. But palace sources have indicated that both couples are set to go their own way when pursuing their philanthropic and social activism interests. A source said: “They are all excited about what the future holds for what they can achieve with their charitable activity. “But they are also looking forward to working together on big one off projects such as mental health issues.” When the Royal Foundation charity was set up by Prince William and Prince Harry in 2009 it was heralded as a sign of the close emotional and working relationship between the two brothers. With their two wives coming on board over the following years the foundation became one of the most glamorous organisations in the charitable sector. Last year ‘the Fab Four’, as they were known to their fans, attended a Q&A forum about their work under the slogan Making A Difference Together. During the session Tina Daheley, the host, asked if they ever had disagreements. William replied “Oh yes”. When she Daheley asked how they resolved their last disagreement, the princes responded: “Is it resolved? We don’t know!” Prince Harry added: “It’s really good we’ve got four different personalities and we’ve all got that same passion to want to make a difference. Those different opinions work really well.” But it is now understood that the two royal couples have different ideas about what causes to focus on and how to pursue them, with one source telling The Sun: “Meghan and Harry want to do things differently to William and Kate.” A board meeting on June 19 is expected to confirm that the Royal Foundation members will split. Its work revolves around six main themes of mental health, wildlife conservation, young people and the welfare of the armed forces and their families. A spokesman for the foundation said: “The work to prepare both couples for their future roles will of course have implications for how they manage their charitable and philanthropic activity into the future. “We are not going to prejudge the outcome of the review, but we will be able to announce it publicly once all aspects are concluded.” The spokesman added: “The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are committed to the work they are carrying out through The Royal Foundation and are proud of what they have achieved together.”

0664 – Royalty

An artists impression of the Duchess of Cambridge's Chelsea Flower Show garden

This week, Kensington Palace released previously unseen images of the Duchess of Cambridge putting the finishing touches on her designs for her debut Chelsea Flower Show garden. Over the past few months, Kate has been working with the Royal Horticultural Society and award-winning landscape architects Andrée Davies and Adam White to design a woodland wilderness “Back to Nature” garden for families with children. Until now, the details have been kept under wraps – shrouding the most eagerly anticipated attraction of the 2019 show in mystery ahead of its grand unveiling next week. However, we know that the garden is designed to “inspire families to get outside and explore nature together”, and to promote the benefits the natural world brings to mental and physical well-being. And we can now reveal that among the many child-friendly, playful features, the 37-year-old’s magical garden is set to boast both a stream and Enid Blyton-esque, high-platform tree house, clad in stag horn oak and whimsically reminiscent of a bird’s nest. The pictures here show just how hands-on Kate’s creative input has been into the garden, which will also feature a swing seat, a campfire and a rustic den, similar to one used by her own children Prince George (5), Princess Charlotte (4) and Prince Louis (1) in the grounds of Anmer Hall, their beloved countryside home in remote north Norfolk.

When she and Prince William were based there permanently, they planted extra trees, saplings and shrubs to create a natural retreat from the outside world, and in many ways, this is to be a garden shaped by the Duchess’s own first-hand experiences of the joys of playing outside and escaping into nature. Lift the tree stumps, stepping stones and a hollow logs we now know that she will present next week for children to play on at Chelsea, and you will likely find not just ants, worms and woodlice, but an insight into the Duchess’s family values and the causes that make her tick. The Duchess of Cambridge is understood to have been a “tomboy” as a child, has always spoken fondly about her childhood, saying she used to love spending time outside with her parents Carole and Michael Middleton and her siblings Pippa and James in the village of Bucklebury in Berkshire, where you will find the Bucklebury Farm & Deer Safari Park and the pretty River Pang, a gently tinkling chalk stream. And outdoor playtime is exactly what Kate and Prince William want for their own children, too. “As a mother, it is the simple family moments like playing outside together that I cherish,” she wrote in an open letter to support Children’s Hospice Week. It’s no coincidence that the day care she chose for Prince George in Norfolk was a modest Montessori nursery, Westacre, where the emphasis was on “free play”, often outdoors, getting stuck in and getting messy.

The Duke and Duchess of CambridgeRecently, the Duchess also got stuck into the RHS Campaign for School Gardening, helping a group of children to plant spring-flowering bulbs, including daffodils and snake’s head fritillaries. According to Kensington Palace, Kate’s ‘Back to Nature’ garden “hopes to trigger memories of time spent in nature” – but it’s not only nostalgia for an idyllic childhood driving Kate’s appreciation of the fun to be had in green spaces, but also her ongoing campaigning for mental health awareness. Kate is seen as the driving force behind Heads Together, an ongoing campaign she fronts with her husband Prince William and her brother-in-law Prince Harry, who opened up to The Telegraph’s Bryony Gordon last year about his own battles with mental health issues as part of their #oktosay campaign. Fresh air, exercise and natural surroundings contribute to both mental and physical health, which the young royals believe are of equal importance. The benefits are proven, and the effects can be immediate: one recent study even found that birdsong can boost mental well-being for up to four hours.  This week, Prince William launched a new ‘Head’s Up” men’s mental health campaign at Wembley Stadium with the Football Association president. Both Kate and William have worked continuously to end the stigma around mental health and “open up the conversation” as a whole. Kate’s focus has increasingly been on children’s mental health, in particular. In February, she visited a number of school’s for Children’s Mental Health Week. “Childhood is an incredibly important moment in our lives,” she said at the time. “It is the time when we explore our personalities, discover the potential that lies within us and learn how to be ourselves. Our experience of the world at this early stage helps to shape who we become as adults, how we begin to feel comfortable in our own skin.” Earlier this month, she also gave a heartfelt speech at the opening of a new children’s mental health centre, the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families in King’s Cross.  “We are all here today because we care so much about transforming the mental health of children, young people and their families. I have learnt so much about early childhood development and the importance of support from parents,” she said. In her Chelsea garden, interaction with the natural environment will be encouraged through the garden’s “multi-sensory” green and blue plant scheme to offer serenity away from screens and stress, set within a bosky environment traversed with paths. This in itself is revealing of Kate’s concern over the impact of technology on modern childhoods. Apparently, during early discussions between the landscape designers, it emerged that she had been reading Last Child in the Woods, the 2005 book in which author Richard Louv first coined the phrase “nature deficit disorder” (£10.99, Waterstones).

In the book, Louv attributes such ills as the rises in childhood obesity, attention disorders, and depression to this deficit – but also offers practical solutions, many of which can be found just beyond the doorstep. Since its first publication, Louv has launched a growing “Leave No Child Inside” movement, and has published updated research confirming that direct exposure to nature is essential for the physical and emotional health of children and adults. According to the palace, the Back to Nature garden “seeks to recapture for adults the sense of wonder and magic that they enjoyed as children, in addition to kindling excitement and a passion for nature in future generations.” Like Anmer Hall, her garden will offer rural respite from urban living as well as an antidote to increasingly sedentary, indoor lifestyles. “The challenge we all have is to make it feel like visitors are in the middle of a woodland,” said Adam White of the design, which the Duchess suggested should incorporate elements of forest bathing, the Japanese practise of immersing yourself among trees for wellbeing, otherwise known as shinrin-yoku.

In many ways, Kate is following in the footsteps of her father-in-law Prince Charles in this respect. A passionate gardener who has long campaigned for environmental causes, Charles has also previously exhibited at Chelsea, designing two gardens in 2001 and 2002, and winning silver both times. Notably, he worked with garden designer Jinny Bloom to create a “Healing Garden”, which featured 125 varieties of medicinal herbs, shrubs and kitchen plants to help with everything from bruises to stress. While cynics may see the Duchess’s debut as a cleverly plotted marketing exercise executed by the Firm, surely anything that aims to get us away from computer screens and paddling in streams or climbing trees again for a dose of “nature medicine” can be no bad thing.

0636 – Royalty

Buckingham Palace has a way of dealing with family feuds… and ‘emotional’ royals never fare well

The Royal family watch a military fly-past to mark the centenary of the Royal Air Force

As Tolstoy famously opined: “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” It’s a jolt to consider that the royal family are actually just like us – unhappy in their own way. We want to buy into the archetypal myth of the fairy tale: that the palaces, privilege and pomp lend themselves to living happily ever after. Tonight’s documentary, The Royal Family At War, debunks this myth: navigating the marriage break-up between Prince Charles and Diana,Princess of Wales in 1996; revisiting the abdication crisis of 1936, when Edward VIII renounced the throne to marry Wallis Simpson, and the current rumoured feud between the Duchesses of Cambridge and Sussex.  Members of the royal family may marry for love – “whatever in love means”, as Prince Charles questioned in his engagement interview to Lady Diana Spencer in 1981 – but history and tradition regularly conspire against them. Monarchy depends on continuity, conformity and the cult of the court. Familial conflict is not part of the regal code. The big business of The Firm requires that it operates as a diplomatic, rational machine. What is not tolerated, far less understood, is emotion. Those that heed the unspoken creed – duty over emotion – fare well. This week, unflappable Kate, who undertook her first public engagement with the Queen, fully cemented her position as a failsafe support to the monarch. Smiling and relaxed, her sunny self-assuredness must have been a balm to courtiers prickly over rumours of her rift with Meghan.

The news that Queen allegedly vetoed the Sussexes’ plan to set up a separate court and be “entirely independent” underlines the essence of a constitutional monarchy. This is an institutional structure to support the monarch, which doesn’t allow for that kind of rogue independence. The fact that William and Harry are splitting courts, as Meghan and Harry move from Kensington Palace to Frogmore Cottage next month,is unsettling enough with its potential for further rifts and rivalry.  History shows that the more colourful, excitable characters in the royal family who try to steer their own course tend not to reign triumphant. Consider the fates of Edward VIII, Princess Diana and Sarah, Duchess of York: all anathema to the British old school, stiff upper lip modus operandi. Which makes me anxious for Meghan and Harry.

The sixth-in-line to the throne is clearly more volatile and openly expressive than his elder brother, while Meghan has the double impediment of being not just emotional but an outsider. Worse, an American outsider who must quickly learn that the British way of coping can appear game-playing and manipulative; what is unsaid is often more significant than what is. Like her predecessor, American divorcée Wallis Simpson, of whom her friend, Nicky Haslam said: “To be an American was against her then, almost more than the divorce.” Fortunately, The Firm has modernised in part, and it seen as an advantage to our special relationship that Meghan has become a part of British royalty. Her gushingly demonstrative nature, however, penning positive affirmations on bananas and describing the feeling of her baby moving as the “embryonic kick of feminism,” must be raising eyebrows sky high in Court.  Hopefully, after the unfortunate loss of three palace aides, Meghan is now astute to the fact that it is the courtiers who hold real sway. The Men in Grey, as Diana called them, have successfully ensured the survival of the House of Windsor. As Queen Mary’s biographer, James Pope Hennessy, warned: “it is courtiers who make royalty frightened and frightening.” They maintain control by undermining power with gossip and setting up rivalry between courts. Clarence House took on Kensington Palace during Charles and Diana’s acrimonious divorce in 1996.

As early as in 1932, Edward’s equerry, John Aird, railed against the courtiers at York House who were briefing King George V against his son, lamenting “all the nasty gossip, which is very wrong of them and does no good.” At the time of the abdication, Wallis Simpson had realised that the courtiers wield tremendous influence, writing: “I became obsessed with the notion that a calculated and organised effort to discredit and destroy me had been set afoot.” She was right. The mantra for an effective monarchy may be duty over emotion but sadly, this is antithetical to harmonious family life. As Edward VIII said of his childhood, “Christmas at Sandringham was Dickens in a Cartier setting.” He considered his upbringing to be devoid of emotion; his mother, Queen Mary, could never understand nor forgive him for what she saw as the greatest dereliction of his duty when he abdicated. She wrote to her son in July 1938: “All my life I have put my Country before anything else, and I simply cannot change now.”

The Queen has followed suit and is a brilliant monarch, though fallible mother. Like the savvy Duchesses of Cornwall and Cambridge, she has never openly bleated about her position, nor given friends the green light to mutter to the media. Camilla, a true blue blood, has kept her feelings tightly and admirably to herself. From being a reviled figure at the time of the Wales’ divorce in 1996, who could have been crushed by the avalanche of opprobrium, she has become the nation’s favourite grandmother, proving herself to be the mainstay of Prince Charles’s happiness and an ideal consort.

Having written books about two controversial royal women, Princess Diana and Wallis Simpson, it is clear to me that emotion is the enemy of monarchical longevity. Drawing attention to fragility is viewed as nauseating weakness, while openly addressing conflict is simply bad manners. Diana became the victim of her emotional life. Ill-equipped to cope with her outbursts, such as confronting Camilla at a party at Annabel Goldsmith’s about her affair with Charles, the Palace found her irrational and difficult to deal with.  The same could be said of Edward VIII. After the abdication, his torment that his wife would not be received by his family, nor given the HRH title, caused him to further alienate himself. His obsessive and pushy tendencies regularly undid whatever miniscule steps had been made towards familial rapprochement. “If you gave the Duke of Windsor an inch, he took a mile,” said royal biographer Hugo Vickers. “He could be hugely whiney, especially to Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth.” If only the Duke of Windsor had been as patient and strategic as Camilla has been. I believe that eventually he could have returned to live in Britain with his Duchess, which he longed for. In terms of true grit of character, Wallis understood – and ironically had the requisite inner discipline to survive – court life. After the abdication, when she received trays of vicious hate mail each morning, she schooled herself to control her inner world. She developed an implacable façade to conceal the extent of her suffering. Unlike her husband, she predicted that the conflict with the royal family was unlikely to abate. During the Second World War, she wrote: “We had two wars to deal with – the big and still leisurely war – in which everybody was caught up, and the little cold war with the Palace, in which no quarter was given.” And never was.

0625 – Royalty

Queen speaks of ‘greater confidence and optimism’ thanks to stable links with Commonwealth on 70th anniversary

The Queen has spoken of the “greater confidence and optimism” Britain can have thanks to its stable links with the Commonwealth, as she marks the 70th anniversary of the “family of nations”. In a message delivered ahead of Commonwealth Day on Monday, the Queen has given thanks for the ” networks of cooperation and mutual support to which we contribute, and on which we draw”. Saying the “enduring commitment” of the 53 countries is intangible, she added that nevertheless “its impact is very real”. In what is scheduled to be her last Commonwealth Day message before Brexit on March 29th, the Queen emphasised the element of “belonging” in a modern, connected organisation.

On Monday, she will be joined by members of her family including the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, and the Duke and Duchess of Sussex for a Westminster Abbey service celebrating its 70th anniversary with music from Clean Bandit and tenor Alfie Boe, and a reflection by Lewis Pugh on ocean conservation. This year, the Queen’s message contains a plea to protect the planet, following her Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy tree project and a new focus on the ocean environment. “Com-monwealth Day has a special significance this year as we mark the 70th anniversary of the London Declaration, when nations of the Commonwealth agreed to move forward together as free and equal members,” the Queen said. “The vision and sense of connection that inspired the signatories has stood the test of time, and the Commonwealth continues to grow, adapting to address contemporary needs. “Today, many millions of people around the world are drawn together because of the collective values shared by the Commonwealth. “In April last year, I welcomed the leaders of our 53 nations to Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle for the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting, and we all witnessed how the  Commonwealth vision offers hope, and inspires us to find ways of protecting our planet,  and our people. “We are able to look to the future with greater confidence and optimism as a result  of the links that we share, and thanks to the networks of cooperation and mutual support to which we contribute, and on which we draw. “With enduring commitment through times of great change, successive generations have demonstrated that whilst the goodwill for which the Commonwealth is renowned may be intangible, its impact is very real. “We experience this as people of all backgrounds continue to find new ways of expressing through action the value of belonging in a connected Commonwealth. “I hope and trust that many more will commit to doing so this Commonwealth Day.”

The Commonwealth Day service will be broadcast live on BBC One and across the BBC World Service. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex, who lived in Canada while filming her television show Suits, will spend part of the day with young people at Canada House making  maple taffy and watching dance performances. Later on Monday evening, the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall will be guests of the Commonwealth Secretary-General at a reception at Marlborough House.

0602 – Royalty

The Duke of Sussex pips the Queen to take ‘Most Popular Royal’ crown, according to survey

Prince Harry at a dedication of the Colo-i-Suva forest to the Queen's Commonwealth Canopy in Suva

Prince Harry is the most popular royal, according to a new You Gov survey. The Duke of Sussex beats the Queen to first place, with 77 per cent of the public having a positive opinion about the father-to-be, ahead of 74 per cent for the monarch. Prince William is in third place with 73 per cent. The Duchess of Cambridge is the second most popular woman in the Royal Family, with 64 per cent, while the Duchess of Sussex came sixth with an approval rating of 55 per cent – a percentage point less than 97-year-old Prince Philip, in fifth. Kate proved more popular with both men and woman than Meghan, with 72 per cent of women and 55 per cent of men approving compared to 61 per cent and 50 per cent for the former American actress. Baby boomers prefer Princess Anne to both of the younger Duchesses, with 68 per cent of over 55s approving compared to 64 per cent for Kate and 51 per cent for Meghan. While William’s wife may be more popular than Harry’s, the The Duchess of Sussex and Queen Elizabeth II laugh during their first engagement together in June, where they attended a ceremony to open the new Mersey Gateway bridge.’ own popula-rity is not based on their rank in the royal pecking order with the Duke of Sussex proving more popular than his older brother. Eighty six per cent of women and 69 per cent of men approved of Harry, with just seven per cent of having a negative opinion of either Harry or William, compared to nine per cent who disapproved of the Queen and Kate, and 10 per cent who didn’t like Meghan. While Harry was the most popular royal among women, the Queen was the most popular among men, with 71 per cent approving. Both princes were much more popular than their father, Prince Charles, who marks his 70th birthday on Wednesday. Almost half of the nation (48 per cent) said they had a positive opinion of the heir to the throne, putting him in seventh place overall. A further 20 per cent have a negative view of him, while 30 per cent have a neutral view. Charles’s wife Camilla is far less popular than he is. Only 29 per cent of Brits have a favourable view of the Duchess of Cornwall, putting her 10th on the list of 15. The 36 per cent of people who say they dislike her is the joint-highest of any member of the royal family – putting her popularity on a par with her brother in law, Prince Andrew. Princess Anne came eighth on 47 per cent, followed by her daughter Zara Phillips on  43 per cent. The Countess of Wessex came 11th in the popularity poll on 28 per cent followed by her husband Prince Edward on 27 per cent. Sophie Wessex proved to be the least famous royal with only 74 per cent of the public having heard of her compared to 99 per cent who recognised Prince William – regarded as the “most famous” royal of all. Princess Beatrice proved slightly more popular than her younger sister Princess Eugenie on 25 per cent and 24 per cent respectively while the Duke of York came bottom of the league in 15th place with an approval rating of 22 per cent.

0590 – Royalty

The Queen’s children help to carry the load with 675 days of royal duties

The grandchildren of the Queen and their spouses are expected to take on great duties in the next year
 

 

The Queen’s children have shouldered the greatest burden of Royal duties this year, analysis of palace statistics has shown, as three generations of working royals settle in to their new responsibilities. The Prince of Wales, Duke of York, Earl of Wessex and Princess Royal have undertaken official duties on a combined 675 days in 2018, significantly more than the younger generation. Analysis of the Court Circular, the official list of royal engagements which are published in the Telegraph, shows that Princess Anne worked more than 180 separate days making her the hardest working royal, followed by her siblings. The Duke of Cambridge is recorded on at least 120 days, while the Duke of Sussex is down for just over 90. Both are understood to have done around 20 per cent more engagements than they did last year. While the Duchesses of Cambridge and Sussex provided much of the public face of the Royal Family thanks to global press interest, their total recorded working days were 100, compared with the total 218 carried out by their husbands. The analysis of how the Royal Family is dividing its work is particularly striking thanks to the addition of the Duchess of Sussex to “Team Windsor”, with the Queen now having two full generations of Members Of The Royal Family Attend Events To Mark The Centenary Of The RAF adults – her children and grandchildren and their partners – to help her. While the four siblings of Princes Charles, Edward and Andrew and Princess Anne still do many of the “traditional” duties, from plaque unveiling to community lunches and charity visits, the younger royals have tended to swap that quantity for fewer, more involved projects on key topics such as mental health, sport or support for Grenfell Tower survivors. The Duchess of Cambridge’s duties were obviously reduced following the birth of Prince Louis in April, taking maternity leave until September. Despite attending several events with Prince Harry ahead of her wedding, the Duchess of Sussex was added the Court Circular in May. Next year, the on-record work of both Duchesses is likely to increase significantly, with Catherine focusing on child development, and Meghan’s private meetings translating into a much-anticipated announcement of her patronages. The Earl of Wessex, Prince Edward, who did at least 170 days of royal work having taken on his father’s role overseeing the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award scheme. He also regularly attending events at the University of Bath where he is Chancellor, opens business and supports British sporting initiatives. The Prince of Wales performed more than 160 days of duties, increasingly stepping in to perform investitures and receive overseas visitors in support of the Queen. He is well known for working privately every day – Prince Harry recently said of his father: “The man never stops.” The Duke of York worked more than 140 days, often promoting British businesses at events abroad – he was in Australia and Vietnam this year – and receiving dignitaries in London. However, the Queen carried out more than 120 days of duties, meeting heads of state, including President Trump, visiting charities and welcoming dignitaries to the UK. The Duke of Edinburgh, who is now retired at the age of 97, kept his hand in with six recorded official engagements in 2018, most notably his grandson’s summer wedding, as well as meeting senior military personnel. While key events of the Royal year have been personal, it has also seen new work commitments. The Duke of Cambridge made a landmark visit to Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories, the Sussexes began their work in the Commonwealth with a successful tour of Australia, Fiji, Tonga and New Zealand, and the Prince of Wales used a tour of the Gambia, Ghana and Nigeria to further his case for the environment and acknowledge Britain’s role in the slave trade. While the analysis of Court Circular reports shows roughly how many days each member of the Royal Family attended an official engagement, it does not reflect the number of separate engagements they had in that day. It also does not measure the wider public impact of each day’s work or the extent of arrangements to prepare for them, with some appearances from the Cambridges and Sussexes requiring heavier security and planning due to the crowds attending. The Royal Family will finish their working year at Sandringham for Christmas this week. The four young in-laws will join the extended family on their annual public walk to St Mary Magdalene Church, where they were last year photographed together for the first time.

0572 – Royalty

Joke gifts and afternoon tea: how the Sussexes and Cambridges will spend their frost-free Christmas

Anmer Hall, Norfolk, Britain
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How fitting that Prince Charles is to deliver a “reflection” on forgiveness and reconciliation at Westminster Abbey on Tuesday. The trivial matter of his offspring’s domestic disharmony will no doubt be far from the heir to the throne’s mind as he takes to the pulpit to deliver what promises to be a heartfelt speech on Christian persecution in the Middle East. But in this time of peace and goodwill, the so-called Fab Four would be wise to “reflect” on the central theme of the future king’s message. For if anyone understands the consequence of family friction it is Charles, whose difficult relationship with his parents, his brother Prince Andrew and indeed his ex-wife have been well documented. Not that a comparison to the so-called War of the Wales is merited in relation to recent reports concerning a froideur between the Duchess of Cambridge and the Duchess of Sussex. As the Telegraph reported last week, while a postnatal Kate was left in tears following a bridesmaids fitting with Princess Charlotte in the build-up to May’s royal wedding, reports of a “ghastly row” with Meghan last Christmas appear wide of the mark. Now the royals’ Christmas is already looking far less frosty than had been billed after palace sources confirmed that the Cambridges and the Sussexeswill spend Christmas together at Sandringham. The Telegraph can further reveal that the couples are both expected to stay at Anmer Hall, William and Kate’s Norfolk bolthole on the Queen’s Sandringham estate, suggesting that any feud is fast fizzling out. An insider said: “Harry and Meghan really enjoyed staying at Anmer Hall last year, especially spending quality time with Prince George and Princess Charlotte and there’s no reason why they won’t want to do the same this year, especially as Meghan is going to be heavily pregnant. It’s the best of both worlds in that they can take part in all the festivities at the big house, while retreating into their own space when needed. There would be total astonishment if Harry and Meghan don’t stay with William and Kate.” Another source said: “No one is going to be kicking up a fuss about Christmas. Both couples know how important it is to HM and Prince Philip for the whole family to be together. Now they are in their 90s, the festivities tend to revolve around the Queen and the Duke spending as much time as possible with their grandchildren and great-grandchildren.” There is also a practical reason why the Sussexes may want to spend a second year running with Kate and William: space. Sandringham House is small by royal standards and its quarters are said to be “cramped”, with sources likening Christmas guests to being “packed in like sardines”. With more than 30 attendees this year thanks to many of the younger royals starting their own families, some will be told they have to share bedrooms, move to cottages on the estate or even sleep in servants’ quarters. Much like the Victorian splendour of the house itself, the traditions of the royal Christmas have changed little since Sandringham first became the private home of Edward VII, then Prince of Wales, in 1862. First, guests are told what time they should arrive at Sandringham — most junior royals first, most senior last — with everyone expected to be changed into suitable outfits for afternoon tea in the White Drawing Room at 4pm. The Queen then invites her great grandchildren to add the final decorations to the Christmas tree as the royals enjoy home-baked scones and a cup of Earl Grey. This is the moment they also exchange presents — not on Christmas Day, which the Queen regards as a religious festival. Trestle tables are laid out in the nearby Red Drawing Room, with sections marked off with tape showing where each family member’s gifts should be placed — again, laid out in order of precedence.

0427 – Royalty

What’s in a name? Louis Arthur Charles is a nod to Prince of Wales and Prince Philip’s murdered mentor

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All hail Louis Arthur Charles. After keeping the world on tenterhooks for almost five days, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have announced the name of their newest arrival. And what a lovely name it is. It is also the perfect riposte to those who have, rather unkindly, suggested in recent days that there is some sort of animosity between the Duke and Prince Charles. The grandfather-of-three has been prevented from rushing to his eldest son’s side to coo over the baby by royal duty, in Scotland, something that is soon to be remedied. It is hard to image a more beautiful tribute to your father than naming your son after him, not just once, but twice. The Prince of Wales’s full moniker is Charles Philip Arthur George – so memorably mixed up by Princess Diana at their wedding in 1981, when she called him, at the altar, Philip Charles Arthur George.

Just as Charles was given his father’s name, William has now carried on that tender tradition and bestowed two of his father’s names – Charles and Arthur – on little Louis. And the show of affection towards Prince Charles doesn’t stop there. Louis – or His Royal Highness Prince Louis of Cambridge, to give him his official title – is a heartwarming nod to the man Prince Charles loved more than any other: his great-uncle Louis Mountbatten. It also features in William’s full name (William Arthur Philip Louis) and four-year-old Prince George’s (George Alexander Louis).

Louis Mountbatten – more correctly 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma (1900-79) – was the Supreme Allied Commander of South-East Asia Command in the Second World War, the last Viceroy of India in 1947 and, later, the First Sea Lord. He was also a supreme operator – perhaps the supreme operator – in royal circles. It was Mountbatten who helped to successfully orchestrate the marriage between his nephew Prince Philip and Princess Elizabeth in 1947; and Mountbatten who advised his great-nephew Prince Charles on all things formal and informal. Both Philip and Charles were devastated when, in 1979, Mountbatten and his grandson Nicholas were murdered by the IRA, who had planted a bomb in their fishing boat in County Sligo.

When Prince William was born, three years later, that brutal act was still strong in Charles’s mind – thus the tribute in his son and heir’s name. These days, of course, Louis is also a hip-Sloane name, familiar in prep school playgrounds across west London. In recent years, it has been a consistently popular British choice, wavering between 61st and 71st in the name charts over the last decade. Arthur, meanwhile, has soared over 200 places up the rankings to number 30. The name means ‘bear’ and also resonates with the mythical King and his Knights of the Round Table. Charles, incidentally, means ‘man’ or ‘warrior’, and has a long royal lineage (even if Charles I met a somewhat grisly end and the monarchy, temporarily, with him).

Some commentators have suggested that the new royal baby name has been given in a last-ditch attempt to advertise the Cambridges’ street cred before Meghan-mania sweeps the land on May 19. Nothing could be further from the truth. From their childhood days, Prince William has always been the steady-as-he-goes, straight-down-the-middle prince; while Prince Harry has been Hal, roister-doistering with his school chums, before settling into a life of military service. But, still, isn’t Louis a bit, well, French? It casts the mind back to rather awkward days for royal families: the French Revolution in 1789 and Louis XVI, who lost his head to the guillotine four years later. The name is certainly French in origin, meaning ‘famous in battle’.

But our Royal Family have been using it regularly for over a century – and, like so many of our royal traditions, its popularity lies with the German monarchy, who favoured it as long ago as the 15th century. When Louis Mountbatten was born in 1900, at Frogmore House in the shadow of Windsor Castle, he was actually called His Serene Highness Prince Louis of Battenberg. It was only in 1917 – with public awkwardness at the German blood of our royals during the First World War – that the ‘Battenberg’ was changed to Mountbatten (‘berg’ being German for ‘mount’). Still, Mountbatten understandably kept his first name, Louis – also the name of his father, and great-grandfather.

ChannelMum.com baby names expert SJ Strum says, “William and Kate are mindful of their Royal responsibilities and have selected a name which works on three levels – as a suitably grand Royal name, on the international stage as the new Prince will be known across the globe, and also a moniker which is already popular in playgrounds and matches their desire to give their children as ‘normal’ a childhood as possible.” So, the besotted new parents have alighted on a name that squares the royal circle; fashionable, sentimental and noble at the same time. And one that will please little Louis’s royal grandfather immensely.

0424 – Royalty

Royal baby latest news: New prince meets family as world awaits name announcement

Pippa Middleton, top right, was the first family member to be pictured outside Kensington Palace to meet the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's new baby

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have begun introducing their new prince to family members, as the world awaits an announcement on the baby’s name. Prince William and Kate have retreated to the sanctuary of Kensington Palace after showing off their third child to the world on the steps of the Lindo Wing. As the Duke and Duchess settle into life as a family of five, the first visitors began arriving at their west London home on Tuesday. Pippa Middleton, the Duchess’s sister, was the first to be pictured after meeting the as-yet-unnamed baby.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle could have been the first to visit as they are neighbours at Kensington Palace. The new baby prince’s great-grandmother the Queen, 92, is still at Windsor Castle with the Duke of Edinburgh who is recuperating after a hip operation. Prince Charles said in a statement on Tuesday afternoon that he and Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, are “both so pleased at the news”. He added: “It is a great joy to have another grandchild, the only trouble is I don’t know how I am going to keep up with them.”

The Duke of Cambridge leaves the Lindo Wing of St Mary's Hospital in west London after the birth of his sonThe name of the baby Prince of Cambridge, who was born on Monday at 11.01am weighing 8lb 7oz, has yet to be unveiled. Royals traditionally keep the public guessing before revealing their choice and William and Kate will want to share the name with the Queen and the rest of their family before making it public. Kensington Palace said the name would be announced in “due course” but the favourite at the bookies is currently Arthur, followed by James, Philip and Albert. The Duke fuelled speculation about the name of his new baby boy, telling a man who suggested he could suit Prince Alexander: “Funny you should say that…” William, who left his two-day-old son with the Duchess to attend a commemoration service, teased attendees about the as-yet-unknown name, as the world waited to hear what the Prince would be called. Told by Alexander Downer, the Australian High Commissioner, that he favoured his own Christian name as a frontrunner for the Prince, the Duke replied: “Funny you should say that… It’s a good name.” The Dean of Westminster, introducing the Duke to Mr Downer’s New Zealand counterpart Sir Jerry Mateparae, joked: “And Jerry would like it to be Jerry”.  “It’s a strong name, I have to say,” the Duke conceded smiling, speaking publicly for the first time since he took his new addition home from hospital.

0420 – Royalty

According to the Dutch media:

British duchess Kate gave birth to a healthy little boy (3827 gr).

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Duchess Kate (36), the wife of the British Prince William, was taken to a hospital in London this morning for the delivery of her third child.
She was admitted to the private department of St. Mary’s hospital in West London. Their two other children, Prince George (4) and Princess Charlotte (2) also came into the world. “She traveled by car from Kensington Palace to the Lindo Wing at St. Mary’s Hospital,” Prince William said in an official statement this morning, and the Prince is in hospital to assist his wife. The gender of the baby is not yet known. According to Prince William, he and Kate did not want to know during pregnancy whether it would be a boy or a girl. Immediately after it became clear that the princess had been taken to the hospital, the grounds for St. Mary’s Hospital filled with journalists and royalty fans. She was, the royal family announced earlier, calculated on April 23rd. In the hospital, the princess has a team of at least twenty doctors and nurses at her disposal. Anyway, obstetrician Guy Thorpe-Beeston and gynecologist Alan Farthing are present at the birth. Both doctors were also at the deliveries of George and Charlotte. Immediately after the birth of George and Charlotte, Kate and William came out with the babies and posed extensively for photographers. Whether that will happen with baby number three is unknown. This depends on how the delivery takes place. After birth the baby receives the title of His (or Her) Royal Highness Prince (or Princess) or Cambridge: his or her royal highness, prince or princess of Cambridge.

Nauseous
Just like the previous two times, the current pregnancy of Kate also had a difficult start. Kensington Palace announced on September 4 that William and Catherine were expecting a third child. The palace had to bring out that news because Catherine had to cancel appointments because of the pregnancy and the serious morning sickness that caused it. For example, she could not bring her son George to school on his first day of school, and in November Catherine left her husband William to travel to Finland alone because she was unwell. After the difficult initial period, Catherine’s pregnancy went as far as she knew without any significant problems. The duchess appeared regularly and beaming with official obligations and worked until five weeks before the expected birth. On March 22, she and William in London made her last official visit before she went on maternity leave.

The third child of William and Kate is number five in the throne line of queen Elizabeth (92). After her death, it is the turn of Prince Charles, his son William, George, Charlotte, the baby and then Williams brother Harry, who next month marries the American actress Meghan Markle.

The first ten on the list of successions are successively:

  1. Prince Charles (69), Prince of Wales, oldest child of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip, heir to the throne since 1952,
  2. Prince William (35), oldest child of Prince Charles and Princess Diana,
  3. Prince George (4), oldest child of Prince William and Catherine,
  4. Princess Charlotte (2), second child of Prince William and Catherine,
  5. the still unborn third child of Prince William and Catherine,
  6. Prince Harry (33), second child of Prince Charles and Princess Diana,
  7. Prince Andrew (58), third child of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip,
  8. Princess Beatrice (29), oldest child of Prince Andrew,
  9. Princess Eugenie (28), second child of Prince Andrew and
  10. Prince Edward (54), fourth child from Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip.

Immediately after the announcement of Catherine’s pregnancy in September, the first bets were closed. Will it be a boy or a girl, what will be the day of birth and how much will the baby weigh? At betting offices such as William Hill and Betway, the traditional names are again a favorite, just as with the arrival of George and Charlotte. In the girl names Mary, Alice, Victoria and Elizabeth are often mentioned and James, Albert, Arthur and Frederick are popular choices with the boy names.

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Kate Middleton’s star team can take a sigh of relief now that Royal Baby 3 is healthy and the Duchess looked good today to get through a ring. Barely five hours after giving birth, Kate walked out of the hospital as if nothing had happened.

A radiant Kate (Catherine Middleton) in front of the doors of St. Mary’s Hospital in London, the hospital where Prince George and Princess Charlotte were born, with her couple of hours old baby on her arm and her proud husband next to her. The red dress that the brunette wore was not quickly scooped out of her wardrobe. About the ‘birth outfit’ of a female member of the British Royal House is always well thought through, because the photos go all over the world. A color chart is used to choose a color that suits the skin. In the case of Kate is known that she would like to bring an ode to Williams mother, the late Princess Diana. Even today it was hit, because before the birth of her second son Prince Harry in 1984, Diana chose a red creation. Those who take the photos side by side see that Prince Charles, Diana and the little Harry were placed in the same way in front of the hospital gate.

The scenario of the big day has been ready for months. So Kates loyal personal assistant Natasha Archer arrived an hour before the birth in St. Mary’s to deliver the dress designed by British designer Jenny Packham. Another important member of Kates star team is her personal hairdresser Amanda Cook Tucker. She makes sure that the brown locks of the Duchess are perfect even during a trip in the Himalayas, so a delivery is a breeze for her. Tucker said earlier that she always has 13 brushes, six combs and two hairdryers in her bag, just in case.

20 men
Before, during and after the delivery, Kate lacked nothing. The Lindo wing of St. Mary’s is known for its five-star treatments, which are aimed at constant pain medication and afternoon tea for those who wish. Family and guests are even served champagne. The medical team around Kate consists of about 20 people, three nurses, three anesthetists, four surgical staff, two special babysitters, four paediatricians, a lab technician and four managers. Doctor Johanna Bray already said that she stood by for three months. ,, You never know when you are called. You have to be in the city and always available. If you’re at a party, keep your car keys in the neighborhood. And especially do not drink alcohol! ”, She described her special job. Despite all that help, there is something that Kate does not give away, and that is her make-up. She is a fan of the products of the American makeup artist Bobbi Brown and likes to give herself well-raised eyebrows and a natural blush on her cheeks. A gloss finish on her nails and silver jewelery complete her look.

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The British Prince William and his wife Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge, have presented their third child to the British people. The royal couple appeared just before St. Mary’s Hospital in London, where Kate gave birth at 11.01 am local time of a healthy little boy.

Mother and son make up for it according to Kensington Palace. His name has not been announced yet. ,, You will hear it soon! ”, The prince said. Think of Arthur, Albert or James. We do know his birth weight: 3.8 kilos. The boy is fifth in the line of the British throne. Kate (36) shone in a red dress by British fashion designer Jenny Packham, with her son close to her, just eight hours after delivery. William proudly waved to the army of photographers across the street.

Kate was hospitalized before 6 am with the first contractions. A little after 8.20 am (local time) it was announced that Catherine and William were to the hospital for the birth of their third child. Big brother Prince George was born on July 22, 2013, sister Charlotte on May 2, 2015. They were picked up this afternoon by their father to meet their brother in the hospital in peace. The British royal family has responded with joy to the birth. “Queen Elizabeth, Prince Philip, Prince Charles and his wife Camilla, Prince Harry and relatives of the couple are happy with the news,” said Kensington Palace, and the Middletons, Kate’s family, are pleased with the arrival of the little one. .