0722 – Oncology

A week ago I started a fundraising campaign for the benefit of the research about cancer, here in Nimwegen, at the Radboud University Medical Center. I want to collect donations, I donate myself on a yearly basis of € 1,000.00 and I want to organise a beneficiary concert by the Nijmegen Byzantine Choir.

Via this secured link: Singing for Oncology you will see the website of the Radboud Oncology Fund and my own page on it: Singing for Oncology. If you want to donate, you can do it in several ways. Within the Netherlands you can use the “iDeal”-payment, outside the Netherlands you can use a creditcard:  Master Card, Visa and American Express. When you donate, fill out the required text fields:

  • Donatiebedrag – Amount of donation (in Euro’s only!)
  • Voornaam – First (given) name
  • Achternaam – Family name
  • E-mailadres – Email address
  • Postcode – Postal code / Zipcode
  • Huisnummer – House number
  • Straat – Street
  • Plaats – City
  • Land – Country (e.g. UK = Verenigd Koninkrijk)

Click on: “Naar betalen” (= process payment) and fill out the fields of your creditcard. When you click on the next box, your payment will be processed, and you will receive an email. The “Singing for Oncology” will also receive an email.

0721 – Tasting Dutch wines

Wine tasting at Pinot Wine café

10 November 2019, 03.00 PM

See related: https://lukebarkhuis.com/2018/01/14/0324-nijmegen/

0720 – Anwar’s columns

“Art is also: keeping hope under bad conditions”

I did not yet know the atmosphere of the old bourgeoisie in the Netherlands. I am doing an internship at an Arnhems architectural office. During the Dutch Design Week in Eindhoven the boss of the office was invited for a chic dinner. I was allowed to come. Designers and traders sat at the table. Guests wore expensive clothes and huge jewelry. A woman at the table said: ‘I am going to an island where there are no people. So there is no electricity. ” The whole crowd turned to her and shouted, “You’re kidding, really ?! And also without a power bank ?! ‘ She said: “No, I find it very difficult too.” “Oh my God, that’s great,” everyone said at the same time.

Meanwhile, large plates were served with a very small snack in the middle. Decorated with sauce and rosemary. The plate with food looked like a graduation project from an art academy student. That you look at the graduation work and think, huh? The guests took a white cloth, put it on their knees and chose the right cutlery. I saw how I put that pile of food in my mouth in one movement. All those preparations seemed pretty unnecessary to me for such a small snack.

On the way back home I listened to the radio. Coincidentally there was a guest speaker who had been to Syria. She told how people live there: ‘I am very impressed how people live there. They build a room between the ruins’. ‘But how?’ the presenter asked. I answered the question in my head. That is the art of living. Art is not just a painting or a strangely curved piece of steel. Art is also: keeping hope under bad conditions. Build a room between a lot of stones to live on.

I immediately adjust my CV: I am an artist.

In the morning, Dutch people look at weird graphs with rain showers as if they were God

I am in my room with tears in my eyes. I look outside and at my laptop. I try to find a scientific solution for a problem with many Dutch people. And with me, apparently. A depressed feeling. I’m searching on Google. It says that the exact cause of depression is unknown. I think Mr. Google has never been to the Netherlands. Otherwise he would have found one cause. The weather in the Netherlands.

So awkward and confusing. When I bring the summer clothes to the attic, the sun starts to shine. And when I go outside without a coat, it starts raining. In the Netherlands you sometimes see one cloud in the sky, but it still rains everywhere. Or you can see the whole sky full of clouds, but it is still warm. I think about my outfit. Almost bare, wearing only underwear and a thick coat, like a clown. How quickly the weather changes seems to me to be one of the causes of depression

My Dutch acquaintances look at strange graphs in the morning. They see showers passing by on a map as if they are God and know exactly where it rains. That’s why they take all the clothes they need. I also downloaded the app, but I don’t understand the moving lines and clouds in my screen. So I’m still on a rainy day with a T-shirt.

I went to the editorial team of De Gelderlander to hand in my column. I saw my colleagues, they were very different from a few weeks ago when the sun was shining. As we say in Syria: “It was as if they had been taken out of the grave with a return contract.” It means that people look like they were allowed to come out of their graves for a while. I immediately felt a little better. So it’s not just me.

Panic with Aldi bag: “Typically Dutch, to turn anything into anything”

While shopping at Presikhaaf in Arnhem, a man stood by a broken bottle machine. He wanted to press a service button to ask for help, but pressed the fire alarm. The security guard was immediately told that it was a mistake by a customer. But the Dutch, who always panic, cannot remain calm even in such a situation. It seemed as if strange space creatures had invaded the mall where customers fled. All stores had to be closed and everyone had to leave the building. A robot voice said that echoed through the corridors.

It is typically Dutch to turn anything into anything. I also had to go outside, even though I already knew that nothing was wrong. When I was outside, I kept looking inside. People in a panic trying to flee a building. The image is not new, only it differs from my earlier experiences during my run for freedom. In my memory from the past I see a mother running with her deceased child an apartment building in Aleppo. They were white with dust. Now I saw a woman running in a panic with an Aldi bag; people don’t know where to go, where they can hide or are safe. Here in Presikhaaf, everyone ran outside and stood in designated places; people, including my family, had lost everything. Our bombed flat was the beginning of homelessness. Here it was only a delay of the shopping.

How nice that a building is already secured here after a possible incident, instead of a large bombing first, after which survivors run out of the building injured. I am so glad that the old memories go into the background, and that I get new, funny memories from you. A woman in a panic with an Aldi bag.

0719 – Solar energy (update)

 

Monthly report: October 2019

Figures as per 31 October 2019 

  • 17.53 kW  produced;
  • € 3.55 earned;
  • 4.54 Kg CO2 emission saved;
  • equals 0.01 trees planted; total 3.73 trees.
The solar panels were only 2 days in production. Installation will be checked 15 November!!!

0717 – Nijmegen

Upgrading Graafseweg: fewer lanes, more space for cyclists.

De Graafseweg will be undergoing major changes. The stretch from Rozenstraat (just behind the bridge over the rail track) to Wolfskuilseweg goes from four to two lanes. The section from the Wolfskuilseweg to the Cavaljéweg (a line of about 400 meters) remains four-lane, but gets narrower lanes. According to the lord mayor and aldermen, the changes ensure that traffic from outside the city no longer uses the center as a transit route to Arnheim. In the new situation, cyclists also get more space thanks to the construction of a wider cycle path or service road. Work on the Graafseweg will start as soon as the renovation on the Waal bridge is completed. This is estimated at the beginning of 2021. The Commission expects motorists to be on the Graafseweg for a maximum of 15 seconds in the new situation. According to alderman Harriët Tiemens, the redesign of the Graafseweg has many advantages: ,,It will improve road safety and quality of life. The Graafseweg is now sometimes used as a highway. We really have to get rid of that.”

New bicycle crossing

Also new: a bicycle crossing at the Cavaljéweg. This would mean that the current bicycle crossing at the Verbindingsweg, just under a hundred meters away, would be removed. Two years ago a serious accident took place at the Verbindingsweg, in which a 31-year-old cyclist died. Tiemens: ,,The planned adjustment also has everything to do with safety. The Connection Road is not a logical place for cyclists to cross.” The narrowing means that there will be room to construct a wider cycle path or even a service road on the residents’ side of the Graafseweg. That happens in consultation with the residents, says Tiemens: “They have the best view of that.” The number of lanes remains intact between Wolfskuilseweg and Cavaljéweg. “If we remove lanes there, there is a chance that nearby roads will be used as shortcuts and become overloaded.”

PR dgfoto Gelderlander Nijmegen: Graafseweg stad uitwaards

Previous work on the Graafseweg

In 2017, the section between Keizer Karelplein and Rozenstraat was already reduced from four to two lanes. Research has since shown that the effects of this on car traffic are minimal. According to the city council, the layout of the Graafseweg is still largely the same as in the seventies of the last century, when it was considered an important route between the north and south of the Netherlands. With the arrival of the A50 in 1976 and the construction of the bridge “The Crossing” in 2013, the Graafseweg no longer has that function. A narrowing is therefore only logical, according to the commission. GroenLinks, the largest party in the Nijmegen city council, also believes that changes to the Graafseweg are necessary. “There are reports of motorists driving 114 kilometers per hour on the Graafseweg,” says councilor Quirijn Lokker. ,,The redesign greatly increases the quality of life for local residents. There are hardly any disadvantages for motorists.”

Criticism from opposition and coalition party SP

Not everyone agrees with this: the Nijmegen groups from the VVD, Stadspartij DNF and VoorNijmegen, among others, have always strongly opposed a narrowing. That is no different now. “An idiotic plan,” says Maarten Bakker (VVD). “Why should bicycle paths be widened there? I have never heard of bicycle jams on Graafseweg. And liveability can also be increased without lanes disappearing. For example, consider extra green spaces along the road.” Finally Bakker finds changes to the Graafseweg premature: ,,Why don’t we wait until the s100 (route over Energieweg and The Crossing) flows through properly before we even start thinking about these kinds of things?” coalition partner SP is critical. “First I want to get all the facts right,” says SP leader Hans van Hooft. ,,What does an adjustment to the Graafseweg mean for the surrounding neighborhoods? On what does the alderman base the 15-second delay? If I am honest, I see few clues for this plan at the moment.”

0716 – Happy Birthday, KLM 100y!!!

SCHIPHOL – KLM is a hundred years old, and therefore officially the oldest airline in the world. Where British Airways, which claims the same, painted no less than four airplanes in historic colors, KLM keeps it modest: almost every aircraft carries special stickers. Over the past few months, the hangars have worked hard to put the stickers on the fleet. This happened during the regular maintenance of the devices and lasted an average of three to four hours. Almost all aircraft, from the small Embraer 175 to the large Boeing 747, now carry special inscriptions on two sides to celebrate the KLM anniversary. Even the Fokker 100, which is parked on the panorama terrace at Schiphol, was given the stickers, and also the cargo fleet and the striking Boeing 777-300ER in Orange Pride livery are provided with it. Excepted are the three aircraft that wear the SkyTeam colors, and the PH-BKA, the first Boeing 787-10 for KLM that has been painted in a festive jubilee jacket. The stickers represent a new challenge for aircraft spotters: all aircraft from the fleet must be recorded on the sensitive plate by the true enthusiast. From January 2020 the stickers will slowly disappear from the fleet. Some haste is therefore required.

07 October 2019, Istanbul Internaional Airport. KL1613 (AMS-IST) arrives at gate D7, in a welcome shower by the Istanbul International airport fire brigade.

0715 – Solar energy (update)

Monthly report: September 2019

Figures as per 27 September 2019 *

  • 236.056 kW  produced;
  • € 44.84 earned;
  • 92.23 Kg CO2 emission saved;
  • equals 0.31 trees planted; total 3.72 trees.

* The connection between the solar converter and the house wifi network was lost as per 27 September; the data about the production of the last 3 days of September are NOT included in the above table. 

0714 – Royalty

It was her final crusade and proved to be her lasting legacy.  On the outskirts of the war-ravaged city of Huambo in central Angola, Diana, Princess of Wales had walked through a minefield that would lead some months later and after her death to a global landmine ban. Twenty two years on, her son the Duke of Sussex made that same journey today. But he insisted the work she had begun had not yet been completed. Had his mother still been alive, he declared, “she would have seen it through.” In a moving speech made at the exact spot where the princess was photographed in January 1997, the Duke said: “It has been quite emotional retracing my mother’s steps… to see the transformation that has taken place, Prince Harry walks the same route his mother took in 1997 an unsafe and desolate place into a vibrant community.” Citing statistics showing a “staggering” 60 million people around the world” still live in fear and risk of landmines”, he argued: “We cannot turn our backs on them.” Visiting Huambo, he had walked the same path famously taken by the late princess in 1997, through a once dangerous area now populated with businesses and houses. He added he had found it moving to “see the transformation that has taken place from an unsafe and desolate area into a vibrant community of local businesses and colleges”.  Citing statistics showing there are still more than 1,000 minefield in Angola, he said: “I wonder if she [Diana] were still alive today if that would be the case? I’m pretty sure she would have seen it through.” Speaking with the help of a translator, the Duke said of work in Huambo: “This is a wonderful example of how UK partnership with Angola can address the issue of land mines, bringing prosperity to an area, creating jobs, helping people access education and healthcare, and making communities safer,” he said. “The work of demining is dangerous, expensive and laborious.  “And I have the utmost admiration and respect for all who do this hazardous work and risk their lives in service to their country.

The Duke of Sussex meets landmine victim Sandra Tigica, who Princess Diana met on her visit to Angola 1997, during a reception at the British Ambassadors Residence in Luanda“I am incredibly proud, as I know my mother would have been, of the role that the UK has played in this transformation.  “But of course none of this progress would have been possible without the spirit and unwavering determination of the Angolan people. The credit goes to you.” But, he said, there was still some where to go to achieve the aim of being “landmine impact-free” by 2025.  Pledging the UK’s “unwavering support”, he added: “I call on all those countries that had their names stamped on these weapons, but have not helped in the clean up, to please commit to ensure we meet out collective goal. “Let’s finish what was started. Let us consign these weapons to the history books.”  Prince Harry ended the second day of his visit to Angola by meeting Sandra Thijika, 38, a landmine victim who was famously pictured with Princess Diana sitting under a fig tree in an orthopaedic workshop in Luanda in 1997.

The Duke of Sussex with Jose Antonio (C), of the Halo Trust and a mine clearance worker in DiricoEarlier in the day, in Dirico, Angola, the Duke had described landmines as the “unhealed scar of war” after emulating his mother Diana, Princess of Wales in detonating a controlled explosion. Wearing body armour and a protective visor, Prince Harry watched as staff from the landmine clearance charity Halo Trust painstakingly worked to rid a remote area of Angola of military munitions. Diana, Princess of Wales, was famously pictured in a partially-cleared minefield in the Angolan town of Huambo in 1997, to highlight the plight of those maimed by the weapons and to urge for a world-wide ban. Prince Harry’s mother never saw her work to help outlaw landmines come to fruition as she died the year of her Africa visit a few months before the international treaty to outlaw the weapons was signed. In a speech to mark his visit, the Duke said: “Landmines are an unhealed scar of war. By clearing the landmines, we can help this community find peace, and with peace comes opportunity.” Speaking about Huambo, he said: “Once heavily mined, the second city of Angola is now safe. “With the right international support, this land around us here can also be like Huambo – a landmine-free, diverse, dynamic and thriving community connected to and benefitting from all that it has to offer.” An Angolan minister attending the event said the “humanistic heritage” of the princess’s anti-landmine campaign was the catalyst for his country’s final push to remove all the munitions by 2025.

Prince Harry meets staff and patients as he visits the Princess Diana Orthopaedic Centre in Huambo, Angolaear the south-eastern town of Dirico the Duke walked into an area in the Luengue-Luiana National Park that was once an artillery base for anti-government forces who had mined the position in 2000 before retreating. The dusty scrubland was marked with red warning signs showing the skull and crossbones, with the Portuguese words “Perigo Minas!” and the English translation below – danger mines. In 2005 a 13-year-old girl lost a foot after stepping on a mine in the area. Jose Antonio, a regional manager for the landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust, took Harry onto the site where his staff have been working since August to make safe, and hope to complete their painstaking clearance by the end of October. Prince Harry watched as mine clearance worker Jorge Joao Cativa used a metal detector to search for the mostly anti-personnel mines buried in the ground. If one is discovered staff are trained to move back and carefully remove the soil as they move forward until they reach the munition. Angola’s landmines area a legacy of a 27-year civil war which ended in 2002 leaving behind an unknown quantity of munitions that have injured and maimed tens of thousands of people. Mr Antonio, said of Harry: “He was very interested in the work that my team are doing clearing the mines. He was very impressed; he knows it’s a hard and very slow and dangerous, and that you need to be very patient.”

Prince Harry in Dirico, AngolaIn June the Duke gave his backing to a £47 million landmine clearing initiative to help destroy thousands of munitions in a huge conservation region of Angola. The Angolan government is investing the funds in the Halo Trust, which will work over five years to rid 153 minefields of munitions in the south-eastern province of Cuando Cubango inside the Mavinga and Luengue-Luiana National Parks. Working with other organisations the Halo Trust hopes the removal of the landmines will lead to the areas, with their wealth of habitat and wild animals, being rejuvenated and opening up to conservationists and eco-tourists. The Duke walked through an area of the site looking at the marked off areas which potentially could contain landmines. An anti-personnel mine had been discovered earlier and the Duke set it off with a controlled explosion which echoed around the area and sent up a large cloud of dust.

Lucio Goncalves Amaral, deputy minister for social integration, paid tribute to Harry’s mother and said his countrymen and women were forever in her debt. In a speech the politician told the Duke: “Your visit to our country is of a great human and historical significance, as it follows the visit of the late Princess Diana of Wales to Angola in January 1997. “We will never forget her priceless contribution to the campaign to ban the anti-personnel land mines. The Angolan people will be eternally grateful for her performance in the demining process of our territory. “This humanistic heritage left by the late Princess of Wales is the motivation for the Angolan executive to proceed with the demining program to free the country of mines by the year 2025.”

The Duke of Sussex meets six-year-old Barnaby Jose MarIn the afternoon, Prince Harry formally opened a hospital re-named in honour of his mother, saying her memory is with him ‘daily’. Recently renovated, the Princess Diana Orthopaedic Centre in Huambo aims to become Angola’s national centre of excellence in orthopaedic care. Speaking at a ceremony to mark the occasion, Harry described the visit as a ‘deeply personal’ one said said his mother would have been delighted to see how the hospital had developed since her visit, when it was filled with landmine victims. “It has been an honour to re-trace my mother’s steps today,” he said. “I lost her 22 years ago but her memory is with me daily and her legacy lives on.” He also spent time with young patients including Justina Cesar, who lost her right leg to a land mine when she was three years old. At the orthopaedic hospital the Duke greeted her with a warm hug, and asked: “I think you were 15 at the time – do you remember meeting my mother?” Speaking afterwards, Ms Cesar, 38, said that she had no idea who Diana was when she visited the orthopaedic centre in 1997. “People just said she was a princess. They asked us to come and meet her. But they did not say how important she was. “She greeted us, and laid her hand on my brow. I was so happy about that. She was very special.” When she learned that Diana had died, “I felt a mighty sadness. Someone who cared very much for mine victims had gone. “But I was very happy that Diana’s son had come to continue the work that she had started. “I am so happy. This is a very special day. I had so much to say to him, but I could barely speak.” Ms Cesar, who has three children and works as a government clerk, said she gave Harry a copy of her project to help landmine victims. “I would like him to sponsor it,” she said.

0713 – Amsterdam

As my sister Clarijalke had problems with her computer and printer, I used my free travel 65+ to go to Amsterdam and solve the problems. First off to CoolBlue with a set of 63/302 cartridges, which not matched with her wifi printer HP4525. The CoolBlue people acknowledged, that the delivery should have been 302/302 cartridges. Having bought that set, we went one floor below to choose a new laptop.  The model was not on stock and will be delivered next Monday.

At home I called HP office abought the wrong delivery. CoolBlue had instructed us NOT to open the new bought cartridges before having spoken to HP. With a lot of efforts I got the following explanation: 63/302 were a new XL version of the 302/302 ones. As only the black cartridge printed a testpage, they promised to send a new colour 63/302.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After that there was a lot of free time left, as there was  no computer to be installed. So my sister proposed to take a stroll in unknown parts of Amsterdam. We went to a former animal shelter annex animal graveyard, presently a beer brewery “Cats and Dogs”.

And I know she is very good in it. As there was a huge rainstorm passing over, we went back by bus and had dinner at the Italian restaurant Libero.