Student housing-NL/25

Our neighbors Friso and Tim announced about 6 weeks ago a Midsummer Party for June 23, 2018. The eventual noise nuisance would last till midnight. And after their promise, with their neighbor Luke at the side of the DJ, the party ended prompt at midnight. The whole gang went afterwards to the city center, to continue the party till 04:00AM.

Brexit & Airbus-UK/FR

Airbus accused of reigniting ‘Project Fear’ after issuing Brexit threat to pull out of UK

An Airbus SAS A380 super jumbo performs a flying display on day two of the 51st International Paris Air Show in Paris, France, on Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Airbus has been accused of reigniting “Project Fear” for political reasons after the European planemaker threatened to pull out of the UK in the event of a “no deal” Brexit. The aerospace giant, which employs 14,000 people at 25 sites across the country, said it would “reconsider its investments in the UK, and its long-term footprint in the country” if Britain crashed out of the single market and customs union without a lengthy transition agreement. But Brexiteers said you “couldn’t have a more politically motivated threat than this” and suggested Airbus was seeking to pressure the Government into staying as close as possible to the EU in order to protect its own “narrow, vested brexit3interests”. Airbus set out its stance in a “risk assessment” published on its website in which it also called on the Government to extend the Brexit transition period which is currently due to run until December 2020 if a deal is agreed. It said the proposed transition was too short for the business to reorganise its supply chain and that if there was no extension it would “carefully monitor any new investments in the UK and refrain from extending the UK suppliers/partners base”. But Peter Bone, the leading Tory Brexiteer, said: “It is just another part of Project Fear. I have given up counting how many times people have said it will be the end of the world. They are not going to pull out. “They are just trying to put pressure on the British Government because they want us to continue to be a part of the European Union. You couldn’t have a more politically motivated threat than this and I don’t believe for one minute that Airbus would move from the UK.” Nigel Farage, former Ukip leader, said it was “hardly surprising Airbus are threatening us today when they’ve taken billions in EU funding” as he also questioned whether the company would pull out of the UK. He told Sky News: “Twenty years ago I heard car manufacturers saying if Britain didn’t join the euro they may well consider pulling out of Britain – Nissan, others like that. “We build the wings in this country. If they close down production it would take them at least two years to put that back in place somewhere in France or Germany. “Big business will always lobby for their interests, of course they will. I understand that.” Meanwhile, John Longworth, the co-chairman of the Leave Means Leave campaign group, said: “The latest scare story from Airbus screams of more Project Fear. “The French-run Airbus is a classic multi-national business that clearly doesn’t care about the UK as we embark on a new post-Brexit future, because it is intrinsically wrapped up in the EU and trying to undermine the UK Government’s negotiating position.” Tom Williams, the chief operating officer of Airbus Commercial Aircraft, told BBC Radio 4’s brToday programme the firm was “becoming increasingly frustrated with the lack of clarity” over Brexit and “obviously time is running”. He said: “Now we have to come to the point where we have to make serious decisions. Quite often those decisions are long-term in nature and without clarity it’s too dangerous for us to proceed. “We’re talking about decisions in terms of safety stocks, buffer stocks of components, assuming that there will be chaos at the borders and that material won’t be moving freely. “We are talking about ‘do we invest in further capacity?’ And we are also talking about what will happen to components from suppliers to us and to airline customers, which today are certified under IATA rules and at the end of March next year those certifications will be invalid. Those components won’t be able to be fitted in aeroplanes.” Asked how soon decisions would have to be taken, Mr Williams said: “As we go through this summer, over the next weeks, we need to get clarity. We are already beginning to press the button on crisis actions. “The challenge of this is not a one-off decision. It will be a series of significant decisions that will accumulate as we go over the next couple of months.” He added: “When we look at the next generation of wings – which is called Wing of the Future – we are working on that today in the UK. Clearly now we are seriously considering whether we should continue that development or find alternative solutions.” Mr Williams insisted no political pressure had been put on Airbus to speak out. “I’m an engineer, not a politician,” he said. “I have to deal in certainty. We can’t continue with the current vacuum in terms of clarity.” The Airbus row comes after Philip Hammond, the Chancellor, warned the EU against an “ambition to force the location of business into the EU”.

Nimwegen_NL/90

11:15h GMT

In the event of a collision between two cars in the Groenestraat in Nimwegen, a vehicle crashed on Friday afternoon.

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That the driver and his companion in the black car survived the crash is hard to believe. The driver had only a small injury on his forehead, the person next to him had nothing! We just passed by on our way for training for the marches.

Three police cars, a fire truck and an ambulance arrived within moments. The street was obstructed for a long time, as the police was investigating the collision.

Royalty-UK/45

Duke and Duchess of Sussex join the Queen at Royal Ascot

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The Duchess of Sussex has made her debut at Royal Ascot, joining the Queen for her favourite event of the season as she channeled the monochrome style of My Fair Lady. The Duchess, in a white and black hat and dress, accompanied her husband in an Ascot carriage for her first outing to the Royal Enclosure, before presenting a trophy to race winner Frankie Dettori. While she appeared to have taken style inspiration from the Jockey Frankie Dettori is presented with the trophy by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex after winning the St James's Palace Stakes on Without Parole during day one of Royal Ascot at Ascot Racecourse. outfits of Audrey Hepburn’s Eliza Doolittle, she suffered no similar etiquette mishaps, mingling with seasoned race-goers and engaged in cheerful conversation with the Queen. The Queen, in bright yellow, led her family in the opening day of Royal Ascot, joined by the Prince of Wales, Duchess of Cornwall, Princess Royal and Duke of York with his daughters. The Duke of Cambridge was elsewhere, undertaking engagements focusing on male mental health and technological innovation in Liverpool, while the Duchess remained out of sight with her three children. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex arrived in the third carriage of the tradition Royal procession, along with the Earl and Countess of Wessex. They would have had much to talk about, as the newlywed Sussexes celebrated the “one month anniversary” of their wedding and the Wessexes marked 19 years to the day since their own Windsor Castle nuptials. In an unmistakable sign of The Queen wearing yellow for the first day of Royal Ascotwelcome into the Royal family, the Duke and Duchess were tasked with presenting the trophy for the St James’s Palace Stakes, won by Favourite Without Parole ridden by Frankie Dettori and trained by John Gosden. The Duchess of Sussex wore an embellished white shirt dress from Givenchy, the fashion house that designed her wedding gown, with a striking hat by Royal favourite Philip Treacy. Fitting in with the strict dress code of the Royal Enclosure, the Duchess’ colour scheme was reminiscent of the 1964 My Fair Lady film, in which a beautiful cockney flower seller mingles with high society at Ascot before being unmasked by her coarse shouts of encouragement at the horses.

 

Royalty-UK/44

Meghan Markle’s firsts: How the  Duchess of Sussex is smashing the royal glass ceiling

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The Royal family has welcomed the Duchess of Sussex into its fold with the knowledge – and acceptance – of her plans to break from tradition. An American divorcee and former Hollywood actress, Meghan Markle was never going to be a stereotypical British princess. She could have buried these roots and slipped into a customary cocktail dress, ready to refashion herself as a royal. But the Duchess hasn’t tried to cover up her identity as a celebrity in her own right, and has openly said she plans to use her platform to promote her views.  Her new in-laws have shown a willingness to not only embrace her, but to let her help them modernise and break some of their own centuries-old traditions. Perhaps she has fought them behind closed doors. Or, maybe, she is the breath of fresh air the Windsors were waiting for. Whatever the reason, here are some of the ways Meghan has broken through the royal glass ceiling…

Harry and Meghan at the Invictus Games

1. Dress codes Unless you’re hot on royal dress codes, you might not notice every time the Duchess breaks them. But she has opted to favour her own style over royal tradition on various high profile occasions. Traditionally, royal women are expected to opt for smart but reserved dresses. The Duchess of Sussex has cut her own path here. In her first official appearance alongside Prince Harry at the Invictus Games in Canada, she wore a white shirt and jeans with a tear on the knee.

Markle has been known to hug members of the public despite royal protocol saying she shouldn't

2. She wears her heart on her sleeve  Another code the Duchess is rewriting is how to greet the public. Conventionally, the Royal family does not hug them, nor take selfies or sign autographs. But Meghan, already well acquainted with fans of her own on the red carpet, has continued to embrace people when she greets them and write messages for them on memorabilia. Her reported excuse? “I’m American. We hug.” The Royal family has also shown it is willing to let Meghan define the tone and style with which she presents herself to the country. As such, her biography on its official website breaks with tradition and offers a personal, rather than issue-based, message from the Duchess. “I am proud to be a woman and a feminist,” she says.

Queen at the Royal Train

3. Travel arrangements The Duchess hasn’t ostracised herself by breaking with protocol, but has actually helped to refashion royal traditions. Three weeks after her wedding to Harry, she has been invited to travel with the Queen on the Royal Train. Normally the reserve of the monarch and her closest set, Meghan will join Her Majesty on her favoured mode of transport for an overnight journey to Cheshire. Until now, only Prince Philip, Prince Charles and Camilla were entitled to ride on the train. Prince Harry, his brother and the Duchess of Cambridge are yet to receive such an honour.

Full steam ahead…

4. Christmas at Sandringham Meghan enjoyed a position of privilege before she had officially joined the Firm. In 2017, the Queen invited her to Sandringham for Christmas Day, where she attended the family’s private lunch and church service. She was also officially welcomed into the familyduring the annual Queen’s speech. Before, guests had only been added to the Christmas list at Sandringham once they had married into the family. Meghan’s inclusion in the festivities turned out to be a sign of the relaxation of conventions to follow.

Royal wedding photo

5. Wedding rules There are few occasions as steeped in tradition as a royal wedding. But this didn’t phase Meghan, who was eager to put her own stamp on the day. The first sign of change was the cake. Royal weddings tend to feature a classic fruit cake, but the Duke and Duchess of Sussex went for a lemon and elderflower sponge. The next was the announcement that she would give a speech at the reception. And another personal touch on the day was the sermon from American pastor Michael Curry, which for many stole the show. Be in no doubt – these small breaks with protocol were akin to earthquakes in royal circles.

Royalty-UK/43

Pearls of approval: the Duchess of Sussex’s new earrings were a gift from the Queen

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The Duchess of Sussex and the Queen appeared to be getting along famously on the Duchess’ first royal engagement without her husband. They were pictured talking and laughing as they watched a ceremony to mark the opening of the new Mersey Gateway bridge in Cheshire. The Queen’s fondness for her grandson’s new wife was also evident in the pearl and diamond earrings the Duchess wore, which Buckingham Palace later revealed were a gift from the royal collection. The earrings had been incorrectly attributed to Birks, the Canadian jewellery brand that the Duchess has worn on numerous occasions. She wore Birks opal stud earrings when her engagement to Prince Harry was announced, and has been pictured in the brand’s delicate diamond-studded pieces several times. Her mother Doria Ragland also wore Birks to the royal wedding.

meghan markle the queen cheshire

But the pearl earrings the Duchess wore in Cheshire carry much greater significance. As the Duchess’ first gift from the Queen, they have been taken as a symbol of her acceptance into the royal family. Although it is not known when the Queen gave them to her, it is fitting that the Duchess chose to wear them for their first joint engagement. The understated earrings were a timeless choice of accessory and perfectly complemented the Duchess’ demure Givenchy dress. The Queen herself also wore a larger pair of meghan markle diana's ringpearl earrings, while the style is also a favourite of the Duchess of Cambridge, who often wears her classic pearl drops. The late Princess Diana was also famed for her love of pearls. This is not the first time the former actress has worn pieces from the royal collection. On her wedding day in May, she wore the Queen Mary diamond bandeau tiara, which she borrowed from the Queen. Made in 1932 to accommodate a diamond brooch that Queen Mary (the Queen’s grandmother) had been given as a wedding gift in 1893, the tiara was subsequently returned to the Queen’s collection. The Duchess did receive a permanent addition to her jewellery collection on her wedding day in the form of the large Asprey aquamarine cocktail ring that belonged to Princess Diana. Prince Harry gave it to his bride as a wedding gift, and she wore it as a “something blue” addition to her Stella McCartney gown as the couple made their way to their evening reception.

Duchess of Sussex brings out Queen’s inner-child: Body language expert analyses their first joint trip

The Duchess of Sussex showed her nerves on her first joint engagement with the Queen, but there was genuine warmth between the monarch and Meghan, a body language expert said. Judi James said the head of state and the former Suits star giggled together like teenagers at one point as they enjoyed their day out in Cheshire. The Queen and Duchess travelled to Cheshire on the Royal train, leaving Euston at 11pm on Wednesday and spending the night in a discreet siding en route before pulling into Runcorn station at 10.35am for the Duchess’ first trip to the north of England.  Greeted by the Lord Lieutenant of Cheshire, the Duchess lingered behind the Queen, appearing slightly nervous as she watched for instructions about where to go.  After a moment of confusion at their waiting car, as both politely waited for the other to get in, the Duchess asked her grandmother-in-law “what is your preference?” before being told: “You go first.”

The Queen is greeted at Runcorn station with the Duchess standing behind her

The Queen wore a green outfit by Stewart Parvin, choosing a colour some onlookers interpreted as a gesture of support on the anniversary of the Grenfell Tower disaster.  Their first engagement was a ceremony marking the opening of the new £1.86 billion Mersey Gateway bridge. It saw the pair deep in conversation, laughing and gesturing as they watched a seven-minute-long dance performance by children and enjoyed one another’s company.  Ms James said: “The Queen doesn’t indulge in worries and she didn’t spend a lot of time checking on Meghan, but instead let her get on with it. “But when she did glance at her, it was with a beaming smile and approval.” She added: The Duchess of Sussex leans in to seemingly share a joke with the Queen“The Queen was the happiest I’ve seen her in a long time. They looked like naughty teenagers giggling together at one point.” Next on their itinerary was Storyhouse, a cultural hub in the centre of town.   The Queen and Duchess led crowds in a minute’s silence to mark the first anniversary of the Grenfell Tower disaster, solemnly bowing their heads. They then watched more performances, learned about “digital buddies” who were teaching their elders to use technology more efficiently, and took to the streets to meet thousands of well-wishers.  Ms James described the monarch as having young body language for a woman of 92. “She looked positively girlish. When she smiles you can see the young princess coming out. She’s got a beautiful childlike smile and her little hands were formed into fists at one point. Perhaps Meghan did bring a little bit more of that out in her. “We saw displays which showed the pair genuinely having fun.” The Duchess of Sussex had her guard up in the morning, showing signs of anxiousness – not least when there as confusion over who was meant to get in the royal Bentley first. “Meghan was still being very careful. She sat with her legs crossed at the ankles and was clearly seeking approval,” said Ms James. The newlywed Duchess, who married the Duke of Sussex in a star-studded ceremony in Windsor last month, was nervous, repeatedly touching her hair. Ms James suggested: “Meghan did so many self-checking gestures of anxiety which is interesting in such a confident woman. “She walked up the aisle on her own without batting an eyelid.” The duchess’s outfit – a beige Givenchy dress with caped shoulders – may have not been the ideal choice, Ms James said. “I think her outfit did her no favours. The caped shoulders restricted her arms and she lost some of her more natural movements.” But the Duchess soon eased into the day, and was a natural with the crowds who had gathered to catch a glimpse of her and her grandmother-in-law. The rapport between the pair was obvious, with the Duchess leaning in and talking to the Queen, producing what appeared to be fits of laughter from the 92-year-old. Ms James said the Queen was similarly beaming with smiles when she carried out her first joint engagement with the Duchess of Cambridge. They wrapped up their tour with lunch as guests of Cheshire West and Chester Council.

Anwar’s column-NL/24

The base

“No, I can not meet tomorrow, because I’m going to a psychologist,” a friend said to me. What an openness you sometimes encounter here. He was not ashamed. Others who heard the conversation did not look strange either. In Syria we see people who go to a psychologist as crazy. We have a special hospital for them. Sometimes when I’m on the train, the train stops because someone has jumped on the track. There are many people in the Netherlands who do not feel well. They use medicines for it, go to a psychologist or commit suicide.
I think I understand how that is possible. In Syria you work every day at the base of your life. You do your best to be safe, get food on the table or buy a house. Is your washing machine broken? Then you save for six months until you can buy one. In the Netherlands you are safe, there is always food, for everyone a house and after one salary you buy a washing machine. You can work, but if you do not work, you also get money. I think people can therefore feel that they are extra in this life. Nobody is needed here. You do not have to work hard to maintain yourself. If I later have a wife or children, the government will take care of them more than I do. I sometimes find it difficult to be happy in the Netherlands, because I do not know what happiness is here. What does my life expect now that I have the basis? Now that my life goal does not consist in obtaining safety, money and a house? I study, I do volunteer work, I make friends and learn Dutch, but feeling useful in a country that already has everything remains difficult.

“Hold up my hand to my wife after 25 years of marriage?”

I was at home with a classmate and drank tea with her mother. She was happy, the mother said, because on Saturday she was married for 25 years. There will be a big party, with family, friends and colleagues. The Dutch do that. They continue to celebrate, even when they are old. With 50 years an Abraham at the door, with 40 years of marriage another great party. In Syria, we say in such a case: “They should respect their age.” “Giving a party or letting you go is no longer appropriate from the moment you get older. “Those people are not ashamed of anything,” we would say about them. That starts soon, because people aged 50 and over are seen as old. As if they only have a few years to live.

A Syrian friend of mine of 20 years will soon have a brother. He is not happy, but is ashamed of his parents. At that age, and then still have a child … I like that old people can also party here and behave as they want. “Congratulations!”, They say to a pregnant woman of 43. “Nice that you still have a baby!” I like to participate in the Dutch way. I want to keep celebrating. When I just wondered how Dutch men can give so many parties in their lives, a Dutch friend said, “Women pay for this too.” I could not. After 25 years of marriage, I hold up my hand to my wife to give her a party. That will not happen. Merging cultural aspects of the Netherlands and Syria is fine. A disadvantage: it costs me a lot of money.

Actor

I was lying in the sun, near a swimming pool. I heard a father talking to his son. He said: ,, I hope you will become in the future something you like”. He made me smile. It is nice that fathers and mothers in the Netherlands think that is important.

I am used to always being told that you have to become something that you gives you pots of money. Doctor, engineer or IT professional. It is not for nothing that you have so many doctors in some Syrian streets, that you have to look for an accident to find the one you have an appointment with. All children who once heard from their parents: “You must become a doctor”. If you are now wondering whether there is work for so many doctors in Syria: yes, there is. We like to go to the doctor. We do not want pain, but just medicines that take away our pain.

The father at the pool was talking about something else, but I was still thinking about his remark. If his son likes to dance, does he like it when he becomes a dancer? In the Netherlands, not all fathers and mothers assume that their children will be happy with money. That is why they do not send their children in that special direction, when they have to choose an education.

“You should become an actor”, I hear my whole life. That was not serious advice, they would have looked mad in Syria if I had really done it. In the Netherlands it is not surprising, but here I do not speak the language sufficiently for the drama training. So, I remain dreaming, along the side of the pool. About a Dutch film with a Syrian protagonist. Then I shall convince everyone. Have a bet?

‘Dutch people love drama on their desks’

When I’m at the Gelderlander, I see cuddly toys on the table, a football, food, papers, everything. When I ask, ‘can I have a screwdriver?’ someone picks it is so off his desk. I often wonder why that is. Do people want to show their boss that they are busy? A Syrian office is always tight. Only the necessary is arranged in an office. It would be crazy to put a pink stuffed dog on your desk, because you will be so happy. Or a football, so that you can occasionally kick a ball on the work floor.
Also at the text office where my girlfriend works, it’s a mess. I offered to clean it up there. I do not need money for it. Just one Saturday on which I organize everything clearly. “No, we do not want that,” my friend said. ,,We feel happy in this way.”
Dutch people quickly feel happy and at ease. I was once asked to have dinner with Dutch people, who still had to cook at the time I came. “Hello Anwar!” they said happy. ‘Nice to have you here’. They grabbed a few knives and cut vegetables. I did not know what to do. Help out? Wait in silence in the room? Come back later? I kept wondering if I had remembered the time of the appointment.
Dutch people also invite you to their home, and do not clean up in advance. I was with a friend, who had to pick up all his clothes and belongings from the couch. ‘Look, sit down,’ he said afterwards. When I walked home I had an ass full of dog hairs. Apparently I had been seated in his place.
When I get guests, from now on I will say at the door: come in! Do you first take off your clothes for your and my hygiene?

WotW-NL/28

102nd Four Days Marches 17-20 July 2018

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Welcome to the official website of the International Four Days Marches Nijmegen.

The Four Days Marches are a walking achievement event for four consecutive days, in which annually tens of thousands walkers are participating. On those days, people from all over the world come to Nijmegen to walk in and around the city and its beautiful wooded surroundings. Thousands of spectators are cheering on the walkers along the route every day. After four days of walking, a glorious entry along the Via Gladiola awaits the walkers, followed by the distribution of their well-deserved Four Days Medal.

The registration period for the 102nd Four Days Marches closed with 51,130 people registered. Since the registration limit of 47,000 had been exceeded, the available starting tickets were allocated by a draw by lot. The results of the draw can be viewed at My Four Days. All participants were informed personally by e-mail about the outcome.

Facts and figures

Statistics provide insight into all kinds of figures concerning the participants of the Four Days Marches. How many participants have started, what is the division between male and female participants, where do the walkers come from, what is the division of medals that have been given, et cetera.

Barometer 2017

During the Marches the Barometer can be found here. It shows the number of walkers that have dropped out or have finished every day.

Registrations 47,000
Registrations on 1 July 44,680
Registered on Sunday and Monday 42,036
Dropped out 1st Day 00,792
Finished 1st Day 41,244
Dropped out 2nd Day 01,525
Finished 2nd 39,719
Dropped out 3rd Day 01,002
Finished 3rd Day 38,717
Dropped out 4th Day 00,308
Finished Four Days Marches 38,409

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Do’s and don’ts

Stichting DE 4DAAGSE has several rules and regulations. These rules and regulations ensure that the registration and the participation of thousands of walkers in the Four Days Marches are well organised. We ask you to read all the regulations concerning you and – of course – also to follow them.

1. Rules and regulations (2018)
2. Restriction protocol (2018)
3. Regulations for civilian groups (2018)
4. Regulations for military participants (2018)
5. Regulations governing distances and rewards (2018)
6. Regulations governing start and sign-off (2018)
7. Anti-doping regulations (2018)
8. Privacy regulations (2018)
9. Regulations governing disqualification (2018)

Children under accompaniment

Parents/carers of children turning 12, 13, 14 or 15 in the year of the participation can accompany their child, even if that implies that the parents cannot walk the minimum distance required of them by the rules and regulations. You can add a companion to the registration of your child via My Four Days on our website. It is possible to do so from 3 April until 12 July 2018. The companion will not receive a reward. Information about companions: Regulations for companions for young individual participants (2018).

Dispensation

v4The Four Days Marches are a walking achievement event, in which the gravity of the achievement obliges the participant to prepare him- or herself sufficiently to the event by means of training. In certain cases people with disability, either physical or intellectual, can appeal to the dispensation regulation of the Four Days Marches in order for them to walk less kilometres a day than the regulation distance that applies to them states. These special circumstances are affiliated to the internationally established standards in sports for people with a disability. This regulation is, however, not applicable to participants who cannot walk their regulation distance due to medical circumstances (e.g. illness). Dispensation requests can be submitted in writing after your registration has been accepted and have to be received by Stichting DE 4DAAGSE by 15 June at the latest.

Participants in a wheelchair

Participants, who as a result of chronic loss of movement of the lower limbs are confined to a wheelchair, can request dispensation to be awarded the Four Days Medal. This dispensation will be granted only under certain circumstances, the most important being that the participant has to use a classic, non-motorised, non-sports, hand rim wheelchair (ADL) during the length of the Four Days Marches. Requests for dispensation can be submitted in writing after your registration for the Four Days Marches has been accepted and need to be received by Stichting DE 4DAAGSE by 15 June at the latest.

Which distance can I walk in 2018?

There are three different distances in the Four Days Marches: 30, 40 and 50km.

v5The tables below show the distance(s) you can participate in, based on your gender and year of birth. In the year of participation, the participant must turn at least 12 years old. The distance marked with an R is the minimum distance for which you must register and is determined on the basis of your age and gender. This minimum distance is called the regulation distance. It is not possible to walk a distance shorter than the regulation distance, but it is possible to choose a longer distance. The distances marked with an E are other distances for which you may register, but these distances are not compulsory for your age and gender. This is why we call these distances extended distances.

Please note: once the Four Days Marches has begun, you can no longer change the distance you will be walking. You must then walk the full distance you are registered for on each of the four days.

Men born in the years:

2003-2006 30km R 40km E 50km E
2000-2002 40km R 50km E
1969-1999 50km R*
1959-1968 40km R 50km E
1958 or earlier 30km R 40km E 50km E

* For military servicemen the regulation distance is 40km, providing they carry at least ten kilograms of marching kit.

Women born in the years:

2003-2006 30km R 40km E 50km E
1959-2002 40km R 50km E
1958 or earlier 30km R 40km E 50km E

Changing the distance

You can change the distance for which you are registered by logging on to My Four Days. You can change this free of charge until Thursday 12 July. After this date, changes to the distance can only be made on Sunday 15 or Monday 16 July at the Central Administration at the start and finish location, for a €15 fee.

Rewards

As with many other sporting events, the Four Day Marches also has a reward system. Everyone who completes the marches in accordance with the regulations will be eligible for a reward. Anyone who is participating for the first time will receive a Four Days Marches Cross. Either a number or another type of Four Days Marches Cross is awarded for each subsequent successful participation.

Digital participant registration

All participants (including group participants and those in military contingents) will be given a wristband upon signing in. This wristband with barcode is used to register participants electronically at the start and finish. Each participant must have his or her bar code scanned at the registration desk at the end of each day.

Start and finish area

Start and finish area the Wedren
The start and finish area ‘the Wedren’ is divided into three places: the Wedren, the opposite Vierdaagseplein and adjoining Julianapark. All individual participants on the 30, 40 and 50km-route start from the Wedren/Vierdaagseplein and will report to the finish at one of the registration desks (Julianapark) at the end of each marching day. Civilian groups line up at the starting gate for groups in the Julianapark. On Friday the sign-off for civilian groups is at sports park De Kluis, this is possible until 17.00 hrs. After signing off, everyone walks the Entry on the Via Gladiola to the Wedren.

Start and finish area Heumensoord
Military detachments and individual military participants starting from Heumensoord also sign off at Heumensoord. On Friday these military participants finish at Charlemagne, the sign off is until 16.30 hrs. Afterwards, everyone walks the Entry on the Via Gladiola to the Wedren.

Waiting at the start

The organisation is trying to spread the flow of walkers over the route in order to prevent congestion just after the start. Therefore the participants are not allowed to start all at once. Of course, when tens of thousands participants have to start within in a timeframe of a couple hours it is not unlikely that participants will hinder each other. So, just like travelling with public transport or when in the supermarket, we would like to ask you to show some consideration for each other, and that you do not cut in line and that you wait your turn. Kindly address each other regarding inappropriate behaviour and try to arrange matters justly.

Problems with your wristband?

Your wristband is indispensable during the Four Days Marches, as you need the bar code both at the start in the morning and at the finish in the afternoon. The scanners must be able to read the print on the wristband. If you are unsure of your wristband code’s legibility or if your wristband is broken, please go to the Central Administration (open from 3:30am-5pm) at the Wedren. After verification of your details, you will receive a new wristband. To avoid a lot of trouble, be sure to do so on time. Participants starting from Heumensoord who have problems with the wristband prior to the start, can report to one of the starting team members. They will give you a temporary replacement wristband. At the end of the day, report to the Central Administration at Heumensoord, where – after verification of you details – you will receive a new wristband.

Starting and signing-off times 2018

 

Distance    
Start indivuals   
Start groups       
Signing off               
50km
04.00-04.30
04.00-04.30
12.00-17.00**
40km
05.00-05.30
or 06.00-06.30
04.30-05.15
12.00-17.00**
30km
06.45-07.15
or 7.30-08.00
06.30-07.00
12.00-17.00**
40km MIL
04.30-06.30*
04.30-06.30*
12.00-17.00*

* On Friday this will be 03.30 – 05.30 hrs. Signing off on Friday 11.00 – 16.30 hrs (Charlemagne).
** On Friday until 18.00 hrs. This time is only for individual civilian participants with start location Wedren.

The 30km and 40km walkers will start in two separate groups. The partitioning of start slots is linked to the (random) allotment of a walker to a registration desk.

A good night’s rest

During the Four Days Marches, thousands of walkers stay in Nijmegen or its surrounding areas at campings, in hotels, with host families, or at one of the many other accommodations available. For walkers, this is convenient as they do not need to travel, but the main benefit is that walkers will also be able to visit Nijmegen and celebrate along in the Four Days Festivities.

Where can I spend the night?

Vierdaagsebed, part of the Tourist Information Office for the district of Nijmegen, offers many opportunities to spend the night. For instance, they offer the possibility to help find walkers of the Four Days Marches a hospitable accommodation with a host family in Nijmegen or its surrounding areas. Many families in Nijmegen make room in their houses in that particular week to receive and look after one or several walkers. And in the course of history, this has already led to many special friendships. For further information and online registration, please see www.vierdaagsebed.nl/en. Furthermore, there will also be Four Days Marches hotel package deal made available and you can also contact RBT KAN for information on campsites. This information can also be found at http://www.vierdaagsebed.nl/en. To establish personal contact please call 0031-(0)481-366280 or send an e-mail info@vierdaagsebed.nl.

Where do I apply if I want to be a host family?

Everyone who would like to accommodate walkers during the Four Days Marches can register as a host family at www.vierdaagsebed.nl/en. There are, however, a few conditions that ought to be fulfilled; walkers should be provided with a good bed and the use of a clean bathroom.

Next to a hospitable stay you may provide for your guests by:
• Bed and breakfast
• Full board (overnight stay with breakfast, packed lunch, dinner)

Nimwegen-NL/89

Hasan (21) fled from Syria to the Netherlands and invites you for a cup of coffee.

h“All the unknown is exciting, that is why it is so important that refugees and Dutch people come into contact with each other”, says Hasan. He fled from Syria to the Netherlands. On June 20, World Refugee Day, he serves coffee with other refugees and the Dutch Council for Refugees between 8:00 am and 1:00 pm at the station in Nimwegen.

Studying or the army

You would not say it if you heard him speak Dutch, but Hasan is only 2,5 years in the Netherlands. At the age of 18 he fled to the Netherlands with his uncle to escape the dangerous military service. His father, mother, brother and sister stayed behind. “It is war in Syria. That’s why many boys who turn 18 have to go into the army. I did not want to go into the army, but to study. That is why I decided to leave Syria. “

Take the initiative yourself

KhoseMeanwhile Hasan is following a transition year at HAN (University Arnheim Nimwegen), so that he can then start his study Civil Engineering. When he asks if he feels at home in the Netherlands, a smile appears from ear to ear. “The Netherlands is really my home! The Dutch generally take little initiative to get to know you, but if you take a step yourself, almost everyone reacts positively. That’s why I like to hand out coffee on June 20: then I just come to the people myself! I hope people do not think it’s weird that I just want to drink a cup of coffee. Probably they think that I am very different, because I come from a different country. But I really do not think so. For me, everyone is just the same.”

People of the hour

Yet Hasan has already found a few differences between Dutch and Syrians. Hasan: “Time for example! Everyone is always on time. If you have to go to work I understand that, but even if I have a meeting with friends and I am 5 minutes late I get to hear that already. Recently I got a message from a friend, if I wanted to come and eat with her in three months. That’s really going too far for me, haha! In Syria we did everything much more spontaneously, then we often called the same day if it came true. That is really a big difference with how it goes in the Netherlands.”

We do not know our neighbors

Another difference, according to Hasan, is the low level of contact with the neighbors. “I knew everyone in my village in Syria. Here I literally know only one neighbor in the flat where I live.” Yet Hasan is far from lonely. He quickly made friends: both people of Dutch descent and people with a foreign background. “I have left some contacts with my time at the asylum seekers’ center. People came by to meet us. I also met people at school. And I do volunteer work at a foundation that organizes fun activities for children and young people in asylum seekers’ centers. My colleagues there are now also really good friends. “